Five Classics to Read This Christmas

Every year, as Christmas approaches, I find myself planning a read list with feel good quick reads that will keep me all warm and fuzzy through the holidays, think about your hallmark movies, but on paper 😉

This year however, I decided to go for a little twist on the ordinary, and hand-picked 5 Christmas classics that need to be on everyone’s to-read list and bookshelf.

In this list, amongst others, you will a fairy tale, a Dickens classic, and my all-time favourite – Tolkien writing to his children as Santa Claus.

“So, my dears, I hope you will be happy this Christmas and not quarrel, and have some good games with your Railway all together. Don’t forget old Father Christmas, when you light your tree”

  1. Letters from Father Christmas – JRR Tolkien

For nearly twenty years, JRR Tolkien’s children received letters from Father Christmas, written in a unique handwriting, and carrying stamps from the North Pole. As years went by, the children were also introduced to an assortment of characters including a clumsy Polar Bear and mean Goblins. Accompanying the letters, would be their Christmas gifts.

This book is a collection of those letters, written by Tolkien himself, in his unique style that we all know so well from Lord of the Rings. And more than anything, this is a testament to Tolkien’s immense love for his children.

Read it as you sit by your Christmas tree, with a mug of hot chocolate and lose yourself for a while in his delightful world.

2. A Christmas Memory – Truman Capote

This book was the first ever Truman Capote I read, and I fell in love with his style of writing. Written in 1965, this autobiographical work is a tribute to the true spirit and meaning of Christmas as much as a nostalgic trip down the memory lane to the Christmases of yesteryears. A very quick and easy read, this is perfect for Christmas Eve or Christmas morning.  

3. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens

There’s hardly a list of Christmas reads that would be complete without this classic by Charles Dickens. I mean, how could you not fall in love with the world of the grumpy Scrooge and his ghostly visitations.

Published on 19th Dec 1843, the book sold out by Christmas Eve and by 1844, there were 13 editions published, such was the love for this story. I also really love the Disney classic with Jim Carey as Scrooge and Colin Firth as the nephew. It’s become a Christmas tradition for me to read this book on Christmas Eve. And if you don’t like this book? Well Bah Humbug to you!

4. The Fir Tree – Hans Christian Andersson

At first glance, this is a simple story about a little Fir Tree who could not wait to grow up and then regrets having grown up.

After reading it through, however, a lot of people have admitted to having mixed feelings about this fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersson – I mean, he was known for writing stories with unhappy endings – like The Little Mermaid.

Personally though, I especially picked up this book for my read list this year, for the core message that the book holds – the importance of living in the moment and being grateful for what we have 🙂

5. The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus – Frank Baum

‘In all this world there is nothing so beautiful as a happy child’  

In this delightful biography, L. Frank Baum takes us on a journey of the life and times of Santa Claus, from his formative years as a child of the forest of Burzee to becoming the beloved Saint Nicholas. Combined with L. Frank Baum’s beautiful prose, this is truly a precious, magical book that will make you want it to be Christmas all year round ❤

What classics are you reading this Christmas?

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